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Copy of MAHABHARAT.

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Harshita
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ARJUN
A gallant warrior and a skilled archer, best known for stringing numbers of arrows in a fraction of second and that with deadly accuracy, Arjun is a Pandava prince as well as the most adorable disciple of Guru Drona. Enlightened with the cognition of selfless action, the character of Arjun in Mahabharata teaches what you should do while confronting an abominable moral crisis.
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BHIMA
Bhima: The second Pandava brother who surpassed him in physical prowess, as he was born of the wind-god, Lord Pavana and Kunti. Another Bhima is the king of Vidharbha and Damayanti’s father.
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BHISHMA
Bhishma Pitamah is the most important character of the Mahabharata as well as the finest illustration of ethics and fairness. The oldest stalwart of the kingdom of Hastinapur; Bhishma Pitamah’s personal life was full of frustration and solitariness, Bhishma Pitamah’s peerless statesmanship and other impeccable characteristics still inspire his ardent followers across the world.
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CHITRANGAD Visibility
DHRITRASHTRA
DHRITRASHTRA had a very low self-esteem and believes that his blindness is a curse, making him unfit to rule. It’s depicted in Mahabharta that Dhritarashtra has a great envy against his brother Pandu and his paragon advices for the betterment of Kuru dynasty. It was Dhritrashtra’s emotional blindness and rapacious look towards the throne which made his son Duryodhana a hot-headed and egocentric human being
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DURYODHAN
Duryodhana is a massively strong leader, a magnificent warrior. Duryodhana belongs to the evil side , holding the traits of greed and jealousy to a specific magnitude, but here one must remember that Duryodhana is known for his hospitality. And these traits are enough to mark him as a real ‘Kshatriya’.
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DUSHASANA
Dushasana, also spelled as Dussasana and Dushyasan, was a Kaurav prince, the second son of the blind king Dhritarashtra and Gandhari and the younger brother of Duryodhan in the Hindu epic Mahabharata
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KAURAVA
Kaurava is a Sanskrit term for the descendants of Kuru, a legendary king who is the ancestor of many of the characters of the Mahābhārata. The well-known Kauravas are Duryodhana, Dushasana, Vikarna, Yuyutsu and Dussala
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MAHABHARAT Visibility
NAKUL
In the Hindu epic Mahabharata, Nakula was fourth of the five Pandava brothers. Nakula and Sahadeva were twins born to Madri, who had invoked the Ashwini Kumaras using Kunti's boon. Nakula and his brother Sahadeva, are both called as Ashvineya(आश्विनेय), as they were born from Ashvinas
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PANDAVA
In the Mahabharata, a Hindu epic text, the Pandavas are the five acknowledged sons of Pandu, by his two wives Kunti and Madri, who was the princess of Madra. Their names are Yudhishthira, Bhima, Arjuna, Nakula and Sahadeva. All five brothers were married to the same woman, Draupadi.
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PANDU
In the Mahabharata epic, Pandu (Sanskrit: पाण्डु Pāṇḍu, lit. yellowish, whitish, pale ), was the king of Hastinapur, the son of Ambalika and Vyasa. He is more popularly known as the earthly father of the Pandavas, who were called so after him. He was said to be responsible and a great warrior, who expanded his kingdom during his rule.
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SAHDEV
In the Hindu epic Mahabharata, Sahadeva (Sanskrit: सहदेव) was the youngest of the five Pandava brothers. Nakula and Sahadev were twins born to Madri, who had invoked the Ashwini Kumaras using Kunti’s boon.Sahadeva had two wives Draupadi and Vijaya. Draupadi was common wife of Pandavas. Vijaya was beloved wife of Sahadeva.
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SHANTANU
In the epic Mahabharata, Shantanu was a Kuru king of Hastinapura. He was a race, of the Lunar dynasty and great-grandfather of the Pandavas and Kauravas. He was the youngest son of King Pratipa of Hastinapura and had been born in the latter's old age
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VED VYAS Visibility
VICHITRAVIRYA Visibility
YUDHISHTHIR
In the Hindu epic Mahabharata, Yudhishthira (Sanskrit: युधिष्ठिर, IAST: Yudhiṣṭhira) was the eldest son of King Pandu and Queen Kunti and the king of Indraprastha and later of Hastinapura (Kuru). He was the leader of the successful Pandava side in the Kurukshetra War. At the end of the epic, he ascended to heaven. He was also blessed with the spiritual vision of second sight by a celestial Rishi as a boon.
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BHISHMA SIBLING CHITRANGAD
BHISHMA GRANDCHILDREN KAURAVA
BHISHMA GRANDCHILDREN PANDAVA
BHISHMA SIBLING VICHITRAVIRYA
DHRITRASHTRA children DURYODHAN
DHRITRASHTRA children KAURAVA
KAURAVA SIBLING DUSHASANA
KAURAVA SIBLING
MAHABHARAT CHARACTER KAURAVA
MAHABHARAT CHARACTER PANDAVA
PANDAVA SIBLING ARJUN
PANDAVA SIBLING BHIMA
PANDAVA SIBLING NAKUL
PANDAVA SIBLING SAHDEV
PANDAVA SIBLING YUDHISHTHIR
PANDU children ARJUN
PANDU children BHIMA
PANDU UNCLE BHISHMA
PANDU SIBLING DHRITRASHTRA
PANDU children NAKUL
PANDU children SAHDEV
PANDU children YUDHISHTHIR
SHANTANU children BHISHMA
VED VYAS children DHRITRASHTRA
VED VYAS children PANDU

Description

The Mahābhārata (US: /məhɑːˈbɑːrətə/,[1] UK: /ˌmɑːhəˈbɑːrətə/;[2] Sanskrit: महाभारतम्, Mahābhāratam, pronounced [mɐɦaːˈbʱaːɽɐtɐm]) is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the other being the Rāmāyaṇa.[3] It narrates the struggle between two groups of cousins in the Kurukshetra War and the fates of the Kaurava and the Pāṇḍava princes and their succession. Along with the Rāmāyaṇa, it forms the Hindu Itihasa.